Mobile Development

Cross Platform

The name “PhoneGap” is quite possibly one of the more recognizable names in this space. Originally created by Nitobi, the name was changed to “Apache Cordova” when it was donated to the Apache Software Foundation. Adobe purchased Nitobi – including rights to the PhoneGap name – and now distributes Cordova under that name.

  • Regardless of server side platform & language experience, a significant number of developers have experience with HTML, JavaScript and CSS. Apache Cordova allows developers to immediately leverage these existing skills. The value of this can’t be overstated – as it reduces training and can enable a quick-to-market stance in companies ready to adopt it.
  • Cordova apps install just like a native application and are able to leverage app store discoverability.
  • Cordova follows a plugin architecture, which means that access to native device APIs can be extended in a modular way. There are a lot Cordova/PhoneGap plugins to choose from – enabling developers to focus on the web-based skills they already have. (This is a weakness as well, as we’ll see in a moment.)
  • Cordova is open source and free, so there are no licensing costs (also a potential weakness, mentioned below).
  • Cordova/PhoneGap solutions existed in this space early on and have matured to the point where value-add offerings on top of the basic CPT are the norm. For example, both Adobe’s PhoneGap Build and Telerik’s Icenium enable developers to build for supported target platforms in the cloud, without local SDKs (meaning non-Mac users can build iOS applications). In addition to Icenium’s cloud build services, Telerik also provides Kendo UI Mobile (an MVVM framework targeted for performance on mobile), app analytics via EQATEC and a Backend-as-a-Service (BaaS) offering named Everlive. Adobe has integrated PhoneGap Build capabilities into Brackets (a web based IDE) and Dreamweaver.